Raffaele Ciceri

Raffaele Ciceri

Raffaele Ciceri was much more than a mere pharmacist: his passion for collecting images of Sardinia during the Belle Epoque actually makes him look more like a pioneer of contemporary street photography. Even if Nuoro and the villages of Barbagia were his privileged observatory, he relentlessly shot during his frequent travels throughout Italy and also Northern Africa. In spite of the joy and notoriety of his life, which he lived intensely and curiously, Ciceri ended his days bitterly and bitterly, even according to Salvatore Satta’s description in his posthumous masterpiece Il giorno del giudizio (1977). Even his wishes for his death show the photographer’s gradual pessimism and his contempt for his lifestyle that was in contrast to the misery of the majority of people: he actually wanted a funeral without crosses, an anonymous burial and the donation of his belongings to a local hospital. Ciceri has never been forgotten and, today, he is even considered a very interesting observer and a singular interpreter of the Island between the 19th and the 20th century. The Istituto Superiore Regionale Etnografico of Nuoro and the ILISSO publishing house have a rich collection of his photographic work (or, at least, of what remains of his work) and a wide selection of his photographs was exhibited in 2013 at the TRIBU Museum of Nuoro.

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